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Posts Tagged ‘Robin Williams’

bobcat-goldthwaitI recently had the pleasure, nay the honor, of producing a live hour of radio with Bobcat Goldthwait. When I brag about this little daytime-talk coup de grace (much like now), I’m typically met with, “You mean the guy with the funny voice?” I give a nod and follow it up with a “but.” And boy is it a big but. (Side note) It wasn’t really a coup de grace; I just like the expression.

Here’s my intro to the hour (excuse the radio-ese):

Bobcat Goldthwait was doing stand-up by the time he was 15. He made his first appearance on The Late Show with David Letterman before he turned 21. Hollywood was quick to cash in on his talent. Roles in the Police Academy series and Scrooged with Bill Murray propelled him to stardom.

But the character he made famous became a mixed blessing of sorts. It brought Goldthwait fame and acclaim but typecast him in a role too manic and one-dimensional to maintain. In 1992, he tried his hand at writing and directing with Shakes the Clown, a movie the Boston Globe called the Citizen Cane of alcoholic clown movies. The film would eventually reach cult classic status, cementing Goldthwait’s standing as an independent filmmaker and a certifiable talent behind the camera.

He went on to direct episodes of the Chappelle Show and Jimmy Kimmel Live, all the while writing scripts for the big screen. World’s Greatest Dad – his latest movie – is a black comedy with a truly unconventional plot.

Here’s the trailer, be forewarned, it’s not for the squeamish:

Goldthwait cast Robin Williams in the lead role. Williams plays Lance Clayton –a single parent and struggling writer – who also happens to be a teacher at his 17-year-old son’s school. After an unspeakable tragedy, Lance does what he thinks is right despite this darkest of conundrums. World’s Greatest Dad was accepted at 2009’s Sundance Film Festival.

A screening of the film here at The Maryland Film Festival sold out the largest of the Charles’ five theaters. It received a standing ovation and a spontaneous tribute from Baltimore’s own John Waters – who was in the audience.

Jed [DEETS] the festival’s director describes Goldthwait’s screen writing as acerbic, touching, and hilarious. Rotten tomatoes – a popular movie review Website – calls World’s Greatest Dad“a risky, deadpan, dark comedy that effectively explores the nature of posthumous cults of celebrity.”

Bob Goldthwait joins us this hour to talk about his movie and his transformation from stand-up comic to bona fide auteur.

Nice to have you on the show, Bobcat ( or Bob).

I wish everything I booked could be this fun.

Take a listen!.

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